From the Intern's Desk

thoughts, tools, tips, and tricks from the perpetual intern

Archive for the month “February, 2011”

How to Write a Thank You Note

An intern needs thank-you cards before he or she ever sets foot on the job. Part of being an intern means standing out among all the other potential interns in your supervisor’s eyes. Sending a thank-you note after an interview shows your appreciation for the supervisor’s time. It also shows that you’re detail-oriented and thoughtful. Who wouldn’t want to hire you?

Tips for writing a memorable thank-you note:

  1. Recall something you discussed at the interview – If you learned something unique about the company, mention it! If you learned something about the interviewer (she went to your college, he’s from your hometown, etc.) mention that, too! Include details that show you were paying attention. Try not to go overboard in personal touches because you always want to …
  2. Keep it short and sweet – People are busy. Your interviewer will appreciate getting the note, but won’t want to spend more than a minute or two reading it. A few brief sentences expressing your gratitude for his or her time will go a long way.
  3. Always sound sincere – Saying you just can’t wait to work for the company and are so excited to be part of the team can come across as a little desperate, especially when writing it to every company you interviewed with. Companies know that there won’t be a connection with every potential intern interviewed. Be gracious, even if you didn’t make that connection.
  4. Include your contact information – A business card or just a phone number after your name will suffice. You never know when you’ll come across your interviewer again in the future. He or she might be able to help you get an interview or a position within the company. After I wrote a thank-you note to a woman I interviewed with, she gave me a call and said that I was one of her top choices and if I wanted to intern for them in the future (I chose another company) to let her know.

Here’s an example:

Dear (interviewer’s name goes here),

Thank you for meeting with me on (day) for an interview for the position within your company. I really appreciate you spending the time to learn more about my qualifications and work that I could do for (name of company, dept., etc.). I’m glad I could learn more about/I didn’t know/Thanks for sharing (something you learned at the interview). I’m very grateful for this opportunity and hope you’ll consider me for the position. I’ve included my business card for your reference (if you included it)

Sincerely,

Sara Steffan (Your name, obviously)
(Phone number/email address if you did not include a business card)

A final tip: if you have neat handwriting, write it. It makes it feel more personal. If you don’t have neat handwriting, still try to write it. Typing it seems generic. Do a practice run on a sheet of scrap paper if you’re worried about messing up. And whatever wording you choose, be polite and always be yourself.

Helpful resources:

The Morning News – How to Write a Thank-You Note by Leslie Harpold offers suggestions on how to write a more personal thank-you with tips on what not to include.

Write Express tells you why writing a thank-you note can get you a job.

And finally, you can purchase your thank-you cards from Vista Print, where you can design your own or pick from their styles, choosing exactly how many you’ll need and even the type of paper.

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Best Types of Voice Recorders

A voice recorder is a great investment for an intern. A digital voice recorder will make it easier to conduct interviews and log information. The many benefits of a voice recorder include durability, ease of use, quality and an extended life. When you have a hand cramp from writing constantly in meetings with your awesome pen, maybe it’s time for a voice recorder.

Get a smaller voice recorder. It fits in a pocket or a purse and sits discreetly on a table during an interview. A quality recorder will have a hold switch that locks its keys. The hold switch is necessary when it’s in a pocket to prevent it from going off accidentally.

Consider several different options when buying a voice recorder:

  1. Price – Ranging from $30 to over $100. Buying a cheap one is easy, though unlikely to last past your internship. A quality recorder will cost closer to $50. Google Products allows you to compare prices of voice recorders on websites such as Amazon, Walmart, and other office supply stores.
  2. Features – For example, connectivity. Can you plug it into your computer via USB? USB connection saves the data on your computer, usually as an MP3. Saving work is important with a recorder so you don’t accidentally record over your last interview. Plan on primarily conducting interviews? A microphone jack may be necessary to get high-quality sound. A less common feature, make sure to do your research before purchasing to see if your choice has a jack.
  3. Storage – Another important feature – storage. How much data can the recorder hold? If you can transfer the data to your computer, that may not be important. Recording long meetings can suck up space. The recorder should have 1GB at least of storage space.

Suggestions:

Sony ICD-PX820 Digital Voice Recorder w/ 2GB Flash Memory and Dictation Correction (available at Walmart, click photo)
-includes USB connection, reasonably priced

Sony ICD-PX820 Digital Voice Recorder w/ 2GB Flash Memory and Dictation Correction

Panasonic RR-US571 2GB IC Recorder Built-In Zoom Microphone Noise Cut (Google products link, click photo)
-feature-packed, worth the investment

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